On Rounds | 4.26.2015

It’s the weekend after end of block exams, which means it’s time to dig through the 742 links in my Pocket queue. That also means it’s time for another edition of “On Rounds,” bringing you my favorite reads of the week.

On the new MCAT | Forbes
There’s a lot to like about the new Medical College Admission Test; with new content in psychology and sociology, MCAT 2015 acknowledges that there’s more to doctoring than biochemical pathways and physics equations. But are multiple-choice tests the best way to identify humanistic, socially aware aspiring doctors? What more we can do to foster diversity and holistic thinking among medical trainees? Allan Joseph and Karan Chhabra break down the good, the bad, and the path forward.

On quack science and journalistic ethicsVox
When it comes to pseudoscientists and their cults of personality, what’s a better-knowing journalist (or healthcare provider) to do? Speak out, and validate a quack? Or stay silent, and let faulty information rule the airwaves? Julia Belluz is on point with this one, and her insights and advice here ought to be required reading for every journalist, scientist, and clinician with a social media account.

On medical schools as laboratories of health transformationForbes
Esther Dyson once remarked that change in medicine happens one retirement at a time. She’s dead right. If we want our healthcare system to pivot from expensive care and late-stage interventions to systems-based practice, preventive care, and population health, the transition begins with how we train future doctors to think. At UT-Austin, the new Dell Medical School is bringing a ‘re-boot’ to a 100-year old model of medical education. David Shaywitz breaks down their educational approach, and what it could mean for medical schools nationwide.

On the value (or maybe not?) of health apps New York Times
There are two kinds of people. On one hand are those who own wearables and use health applications: the young, the affluent, the health-conscious. On the other hand are those who might often benefit from digital health but can rarely afford it: chronic disease patients, the elderly, and those with limited access to care. Today, the consumer market for health apps and devices is larger than ever. How do we connect tech fads to health outcomes? How do we balance rapid innovation with health equity? This NYT article doesn’t offer all the answers, but it raises many of the right questions.

On restoring the ‘joy of medicine’Medstro
When it comes to physician lifestyle, we keep hearing the same stuff: provider burnout is at a high; satisfaction is at a low; most doctors today wouldn’t recommend the profession to their children. We know all that; now, what are we going to do about it? Medstro and Geneia’s “Joy of Medicine Challenge” invites your ideas to restore joy to the practice of medicine, and they’re offering $1,000 for your thoughts. Instead of talking about how our healthcare system is broken, let’s ideate on how to fix it.

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On Rounds | 3.24.15

In recent months, as I’ve transitioned from senioritis to sleep deprivation, I’ve come to appreciate the value of brevity. Goodbye, RSS; hello, Twitter, Circa, and BriefMe.

It’s with this perspective that I’m launching ‘On Rounds,’ a (hopefully!) weekly curation of big ideas, reflections, and byte-sized foods for thought. If you’re finding it tough to keep up with the world beyond the lecture hall or clinic, outsource that task to me.

On sitting with patients | New York Times
We often discuss empathy decline in medical training, and why it occurs; in this insightful, incisive piece, Dhruv Khullar absolutely nails it. Pre-meds don’t aspire to treat medical records and lab values, but people. But in medical school, knowing the patient takes a back-seat to knowing the pathophysiology, creating a rift between expectation and reality.

On MOOCs and medical training | Slate
While the MOOC is no longer a novelty, it’s still an enigma: what’s the place of online education in the knowledge market of the 21st century? This month, Yale raised the stakes by announcing its new online physician’s assistant program. In light of an imminent physician shortage and the ever-rising costs of higher education, one has to wonder: is there a place for online, or hybrid, education in medical training?

On re-designing deathCalifornia Sunday
Ideo, the legendary design firm, has built its brand on challenging assumptions and breaking the barriers of, “Well, we’ve always done it this way.” What happens when the strategies that have driven the design of products are instead applied to processes—say, death? And more crucially, how do we inspire and train clinicians to apply the design framework to the act of doctoring, itself?

On UX designMedium
What are the skills and roles that effective design requires? Irene Au breaks it down here, and spoiler alert—the parallels to patient care are remarkable. If we envision the bedside encounter as a co-design collaboration between a patient and provider, the implications and applications in this piece for clinical medicine are fascinating.

On health tech and how bad it isNew York Times
In most fields, the technologies work for the people; in healthcare, the people work for the technologies. Here, Bob Wachter explains why the transition to electronic health records has been a rough one, then lays a roadmap to realizing the value and potential of digital medicine. It’s a daunting task, but an essential one if we eventually hope to treat patients, rather than “iPatients.”