On Rounds | 3.24.15

In recent months, as I’ve transitioned from senioritis to sleep deprivation, I’ve come to appreciate the value of brevity. Goodbye, RSS; hello, Twitter, Circa, and BriefMe.

It’s with this perspective that I’m launching ‘On Rounds,’ a (hopefully!) weekly curation of big ideas, reflections, and byte-sized foods for thought. If you’re finding it tough to keep up with the world beyond the lecture hall or clinic, outsource that task to me.

On sitting with patients | New York Times
We often discuss empathy decline in medical training, and why it occurs; in this insightful, incisive piece, Dhruv Khullar absolutely nails it. Pre-meds don’t aspire to treat medical records and lab values, but people. But in medical school, knowing the patient takes a back-seat to knowing the pathophysiology, creating a rift between expectation and reality.

On MOOCs and medical training | Slate
While the MOOC is no longer a novelty, it’s still an enigma: what’s the place of online education in the knowledge market of the 21st century? This month, Yale raised the stakes by announcing its new online physician’s assistant program. In light of an imminent physician shortage and the ever-rising costs of higher education, one has to wonder: is there a place for online, or hybrid, education in medical training?

On re-designing deathCalifornia Sunday
Ideo, the legendary design firm, has built its brand on challenging assumptions and breaking the barriers of, “Well, we’ve always done it this way.” What happens when the strategies that have driven the design of products are instead applied to processes—say, death? And more crucially, how do we inspire and train clinicians to apply the design framework to the act of doctoring, itself?

On UX designMedium
What are the skills and roles that effective design requires? Irene Au breaks it down here, and spoiler alert—the parallels to patient care are remarkable. If we envision the bedside encounter as a co-design collaboration between a patient and provider, the implications and applications in this piece for clinical medicine are fascinating.

On health tech and how bad it isNew York Times
In most fields, the technologies work for the people; in healthcare, the people work for the technologies. Here, Bob Wachter explains why the transition to electronic health records has been a rough one, then lays a roadmap to realizing the value and potential of digital medicine. It’s a daunting task, but an essential one if we eventually hope to treat patients, rather than “iPatients.”

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