Medicine, Live-Streamed?

MeerkatAs a health tech optimist, I’m constantly fascinated—and completely stumped—by the science of ‘viral’ ideas. What is it that makes some innovations emerge, ignite, and transform, while others stumble, sputter, and fade?

Take live-streaming, for example. The concept of broadcasting one’s first-person perspective in real-time isn’t a novel notion. It’s existed since the early 1990s, when tech pioneers like Steve Mann strapped on cameras and webcast their lives to the world. And, if you’re a millennial in medicine, it’s how you attended medical school.

So what makes Meerkat, the latest ‘app of the moment,’ matter? The short answer: simplicity.

Until now, live-streaming has been done by big institutions for big events: the State of the Union, Apple product reveals, March Madness games. Sure, casual users have YouTube or Vine, but the real-time element of a live-stream takes engagement a step further.

Meerkat now empowers you, the viewer, to become the broadcaster. Open the app, click ‘stream,’ and cast via a link that’s available on your Twitter feed. It’s intuitive, instant, and inexpensive—it’s Meerkat.

How might we leverage this real-time capacity to share our perspectives to enrich medicine?

To transfer knowledge. Take it from a medical student: conferences cost. A lot. An academic conference is a buffet of food for thought, but learners and patients are often left to catch the leftovers through tweets and news releases. Now imagine a future where every presentation, pitch, and panel is immediately available. Imagine a future where your audience isn’t just a room of conference-goers, but the global Twitterati. And imagine the impact that will have on the time to translate insights from bench to bedside.

To foster empathy. Too often, the communication gaps and patient-provider tensions in healthcare are rooted in a failure to understand the other’s experience. Live-streamers invite their audience to watch the world through their eyes, to witness the challenges they face daily, and to respond accordingly. What if providers could observe the barriers that prevent their patients from adhering to treatments? What if patients could see why their doctor seems distracted, or doesn’t have an answer to every question? With Meerkat, it’s possible, quite literally, to walk a mile in someone’s shoes.

To promote accountability. When the world’s watching, we sit up straight and put on our best behavior. The ability to (broad)cast public scrutiny on any individual is powerful—perhaps, too powerful. Whether or not we should put others under this spotlight, the indisputable truth is that we can. That alone should make hospitals and providers pay attention.

Let’s be realistic: Meerkat isn’t likely to be the next Twitter or Facebook; it’s too ephemeral, too public, and too inconspicuous to replace more established forms of public dialogue. But it does open opportunities to communicate visually and to communicate live. And in a discipline where many of our biggest problems are communication problems, that’s worth thinking about.

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